Cost / Schedule / Function

Project Scoping

Arriving at reliable cost estimates and realistic timelines for large-scale software development projects is a challenge—but we have the tools to make it possible.

 


Osprey has a proven repeatable process for estimating the costs of software development projects which we call Cost Schedule Function™ (CSF). The Osprey CSF provides our clients with a clear, detailed picture of: 

What Will Be Delivered?

 

We work with our client’s stakeholders and subject matter experts to develop an in-depth understanding of their business needs and goals for the project and design a software solution that meets those needs.

 

We break the proposed new system down into the constituent components that will be needed to make the solution work (such as classes of business objects, user interface elements, server processes, integration points with other systems) and estimate the costs of developing each of them.

When Will It Be Delivered?

 

We work with our client’s stakeholders and subject matter experts to develop an in-depth understanding of their business needs and goals for the project and design a software solution that meets those needs.

 

We break the proposed new system down into the constituent components that will be needed to make the solution work (such as classes of business objects, user interface elements, server processes, integration points with other systems) and estimate the costs of developing each of them.

 

How Much Will It Cost?


Based on the development effort for each component, we estimate all the costs that are inherent in the software development life cycle: costs for UML analysis, for system design, for development, for testing, for deployment.

We plan the make-up of the project team over the life of the project – how many people with what specialties will be needed in each stage of the project, and the associated costs over time.

We add in costs the project will incur for hardware expenses and for other software that may have to be layered in to the system we are building.

We always include an uncertainty buffer to cover unanticipated costs that may emerge.